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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
to senator marco rubio, had a sit-down conversation with him. i guess when you talked to him, you took another crack at that science question. clarify an answer he gave to "gq" when he was asked about the age of the earth. remember, senator rubio took a little grief, saying that he was not qualified to answer the question, calling it, quote, one of life's great mysteries. remember, i'm not a scientist, man, the whole thing. yesterday, mike, i guess you spoke to him as part of the "playbook" breakfast and you gave him a chance to explain that answer. let's listen. >> how old do you think the earth is? >> first of all, the answer i gave was trying to make the same point the president made a few years ago, and that is there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. i mean, it's established it. pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a theological debate which is a pretty healthy debate. >> mike, what did you come away with talking to marco rubio yesterday? >> people in the room came away thinking that he was really smooth, really on his game. and thi
senator marco rubio punted on the question of how old the earth is, calling it a great mystery. it's not a mystery it's what the potential presidential candidate for 2016 was playing to the large number of evangelicals who believe in the literal truth of the bible. fast forward to today where rubio was given a retake on that pop question by politico's michael len. >> there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. it's established pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a theological debate, which is a pretty healthy debate. >> rubio went on to say americans should teach children science but they also have the right to teach them religion. that's interesting. senator, you can't teach religion in public schools. by the way, think about it, what religion would you teach in public schools? we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." what is the washington gridlock on fiscal negotiations look like to the rest of the world, particularly europe where eurozone are taking drastic budget cuts and austerity measures that make our situation look
billion dollars among friends? anyway, last month republican senator marco rubio punted on the question of how old the earth is, calling it a great mystery. it's not a mystery it's what the potential presidential candidate for 2016 was playing to the large number of evangelicals who believe in the literal truth of the bible. fast forward to yesterday when rubio was given a retake on that pop question by politico's mike all allen. >> there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. it's established pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a these logical debate, which is a pretty healthy debate. >> rubio went on to say americans should teach children science but they also have the right to teach them religion. that's interesting. senator, you can't teach religion in public schools. by the way, think about it, what religion would you teach in public schools? would you want to decide that? this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day..
when these come out. >> bill:est an, we found out yesterday, you wrote about this. marco rubio has seen the light. it wasn't so long ago he said don't ask me how old the earth is. maybe 100 years. seemed to be saying that he was a creationist, if you will. and yesterday yeah, you do have your ifb in. >> oh, yeah. >> bill: in an interview -- i forget. from politico. he tried to say no, i'm not really as dumb as i seem to be a few weeks back. here it is. >> the answer i gave was actually trying to make the same point the president made a few years ago. and that is there is no scientific debate on the able of the earth. it is established definitively. at least four and a half billion years old. >> bill: why is rubio getting into this anyhow? >> you have to thank "gq" for asking him the first question. they asked him in an interview how old do you think the earth is? he said i'm not a scientist man. classic rubio quote now. then he -- now, he's saying that he -- i guess he talked to some scientists and now he beli
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)